Entries Tagged as 'Pike'

Answers to the pike and muskie quiz

If you still have not answered the questions to last months pike and muskie newsletter, here are the answers:

  1. Q: What water temperature do these fish prefer?
    A: mid 60s- low 70s. When pike reach 30 inches and more they prefer water temperatures of 50-55F
  2. What are the main differences in color and tail shape between pike and muskie?
    A: Pike: green with rows of light oval shaped spots, with a rounded tail that has dark spots. Muskie: silver or light green with dark bars and spots with a sharper tail with or without dark spots.
  3. Q: Where can you find these fish in shallow natural lakes during the late fall and winter?
    A: deep, rocky humps and deep holes surrounded by shallow lakes waters with high oxygen levels.
  4. Q: Where can you find these fish in rivers during the early spring through to spawning?
    A:shallow back water lakes in big rivers, seasonally flooded sloughs in small rivers.
  5. Q: What kind of bait is preferred for these fish in weedy cover?
    A: Spinnerbaits and bucktails.
  6. Q: When is spoon fishing the best technique?
    A: when you are a beginner but also for seasoned fishers since they are ideal for trolling.
  7. Q: TRUE/FALSE: Ice fishing pike yeilds the best results when you use a live or dead fish bait on a 25-40 pound braided superline with a braided wire leader and a size 2/0 to 6/0 single hook.
    A: TRUE.
  8. Q: When do pike and muskie spawn?
    A: Pike will spawn in the early spring when water reaches low-mid 40s, muskies a few week later.
  9. Q: What are hybrids of pike and muskie called?
    A: Tiger muskies
  10. Q: What does pike and muskies diet consist of?
    A: Mostly fish but they have been known to eat frogs, mice, ducklings, and even muskrats.

Quiz for Pike and muskie

If you know the answers to these simple questions, you are an excellent pike and muskie fisher. If not, read the articles about pike and muskie to become an excellent pike and muskie fisher. If you still cannot find the answers, do not worry. Next months newsletter will have the answers to these questions.

  1. What water temperature do these fish prefer?
  2. What are the main differences in color and tail shape between pike and muskie?
  3. Where can you find these fish in shallow natural lakes during the late fall and winter?
  4. Where can you find these fish in rivers during the early spring through to spawning?
  5. What kind of bait is preferred for these fish in weedy cover?
  6. When is spoon fishing the best technique?
  7. TRUE/FALSE: Ice fishing pike yeilds the best results when you use a live or dead fish bait on a 25-40 pound braided superline with a braided wire leader and a size 2/0 to 6/0 single hook.
  8. When do pike and muskie spawn?
  9. What are hybrids of pike and muskie called?
  10. What does pike and muskies diet consist of?

Find your pike and muskie

Knowing where pike and muskie swim at certain times of the year is a key factor in actually catching pike.
Pike and muskie are very similar fish so they have been grouped together in this series of articles. They are considered a cool water fish, usually staying in waters in the mid 60s to low 70s. Usually though once a pike reaches 30 inches, they begin to favor water that is cooler somewhere around 50 to 55ºF. Pike are green sided with rows of oval shaped light colored spots where Muskie are light green to silver sided with dark bars or spots. A pikes tail is rounded with dark spots where a muskies tail is sharper with either small spots or no spots at all. Both are generally found in weedy natural lakes and slow moving weedy rivers. Here are some prime locations for these fish:

In Shallow Natural Lakes

Early Spring through spawning:
• Marshes connected to the main lake
• Shallow, weedy bays

Late Spring though Early Summer:
• Weedlines and weedy humps and points close to spawning bays
• Shallow gravel or rock bars

Mid-Summer through Early Fall:
• Beds of lily pads or other floating vegetation that keeps the water cooler
• Bars, points and flats with a healthy growth of submerged weeds, particularly cabbage.
• Edges of deep bulrush beds
• Weedy saddles connecting two islands or a point and an island
• Pike: Inflowing springs

Late Fall and Winter:
• Deep, rocky humps
• Deep holes surrounded by shallow water in lakes with high oxygen levels.

In Deep Natural Lakes

Early Spring through Spawning:
• Shallow, mud-bottomed bays attract pike soon after ice out and muskies a few weeks later.

Late Spring through Early Summer:
• Shallow flats just outside of spawning bays, particularly those with weedy or rocky cover
• Channels leading from the spawning bay to the main lake

Mid-Summer through early Fall:
• Mouths of good-sized inlet streams
• Pike: Rocky reefs below the thermocline
• Shallow rocky reefs
• Deep narrows that have moving water on windy days
• Clusters of islands that have extended lips with submerged weed beds
• Weedy or rocky points that slope gradually into deep water.

Late Fall:
• Gravelly shoals and points that serve as spawning areas for ciscoes when the water temperature drops to the mid-40s.
• Rocky points and humps that slope sharply into deep water

Winter:
• Shallow bays

In Rivers:

Early Spring through Spawning:
• Shallow backwater lakes in big rivers
• Seasonally flooded lakes in small rivers

Late Spring through Early Summer:
• Tailwaters of dams
• Deep, weedy backwaters and side channels

Mid-Summer through Mid-Fall:
• Good-sized eddies that form below islands, points or sand bars
• Current breaks, where there is a distinct line between fast and slow water
• Pike: Spring holes
• Pike: Mouths of cold water streams

Late fall and winter:
• Shallow backwater areas through the early winter
• Deep holes in backwaters in the late winter
• Impoundments about low-head dams in small rivers

Year-round locations in smaller rivers:
• Deep pools with light current
• Deep oxbow lakes off main river

Keep this information handy, it means the difference between an average fisher and an expert fisher. Also if you naturally know where to find these fish you will not have to break out the fish finder.